How much does it cost to spend 5 days in Alsace?

by gigigriffis
Colmar

Welcome back to my money series, where I keep track of my real spending in locations around the world. 

Today, it’s time to break down my spending for half of my summer (July) vacation: five days in pretty Colmar, France.

After five days of stuffing ourselves in Paris, our time in Alsace took on a slower pace with a little less food-centricity. We did a food tour in Strasbourg (full disclosure, it was free, so the numbers below don’t reflect it) and had lunch at a two-Michelin-star restaurant in Colmar, but other than that, our focus was on landscapes over food.

Mostly, we spent our time exploring adorable villages, walking through vineyards, and logging blissful hours of doing approximately nothing in our pretty Airbnb.

So, what did we spend on five days of mellow wandering through vineyards and walled villages? Here’s the skinny:


Category Local currency Dollars
Accommodations 215.77 $239.35
Transportation (national/international) 69.21 $76.77
Transportation (local) 10.95 $12.15
Groceries 70.53 $78.24
Supplies 4.89 $5.42
Eating/drinking out 95.51 $105.95
Luna (vet bills, supplies) 19.18 $21.28
Totals 486.04 $539.16

Notes on my spending

This is still very much high season, which means our budget is probably a bit more than it would be if we’d come in the fall or spring. Keep in mind that the above numbers are my portion of the trip and do not include Chad’s spending.

As usual, our accommodations were through Airbnb. We had a gorgeous two-bedroom (with one of those bedrooms lofted) on the top floor of a building tucked down a side street off the streets of old town. The location was perfect. The interior was adorable. We, in short, loved it and would stay here again.

International transportation includes the cost of my train ticket from Paris to Colmar and a series of trains back home to Uttigen, Switzerland, after the trip. 

Local transportation is the cost of buses and trains to our day trip destinations of Strasbourg, Kaysersberg, and Wintzenheim.

Dining out included several meals at a little sushi restaurant (because we needed a break from French food after our gluttonous time in Paris) and lunch at the fanciest place in town. We ate most of our meals out (or had leftovers from said meals back at home at the next mealtime), but we did grab groceries a couple times, eating breakfast, snacks, and occasionally dinner in. 

Want to see more nomad budgets? Check out this extensive piece with links to all my published budgets from the last seven-ish years.

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